People are having airplane food delivered to their homes during coronavirus pandemic


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People must really miss being on airplanes.

With fewer people flying than normal, it appears that some regular travelers are looking to recreate the experience. While some people have tried to recreate vacation scenes or airplane window views from home, people looking for something simpler are in luck.

Imperfect Foods is selling snack packs, which include mixed cheeses, crackers and dried cherries from JetBlue airline.

Imperfect Foods is selling snack packs, which include mixed cheeses, crackers and dried cherries from JetBlue airline.
(iStock)

An online surplus-stock grocery store is selling airplane food to be delivered to customers’ homes, WBBM 780 reports. Now, the company’s subscribers can relive the experience of eating a snack on an airplane from the comfort of their own home.

Imperfect Foods received the snack packs, which include mixed cheeses, crackers and dried cherries from JetBlue Airways. According to the news outlet, the airline’s meal supplier saw a decline in business-class and economy seats.

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Philip Behn, chief executive of Imperfect Foods, told the outlet, “This was one of our first COVID-19 food waste recovery opportunities. We could only take a fraction of what they had.”

A spokesperson for JetBlue told WBBM that the airline had reduced its in-flight food and beverage service as a way to decrease contact between crew members and passengers to fight the spread of COVID-19.

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Behn spoke with the Washington Post, saying that Imperfect Foods has sold 40,000 of the snack trays. He also discussed how many companies are currently looking for ways to unload food items that were originally meant to be sold for restaurant, hotel or travel businesses. Unfortunately, these products aren’t packaged with individual customers in mind.

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Behn described his company’s actions as “breaking bulk,” explaining, “We have stepped up with co-packers to try and repackage some of those products. It’s hard work and it’s slow given the importance of food safety.”



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