Iceland forest rangers encouraging citizens to hug trees during quarantine


Get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox. Sign up here.

Hug trees, not friends — that’s the message Iceland forest rangers are sending to the public amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Park rangers at Iceland’s Hallormsstaður National Forest are reportedly instructing people to seek solace in nature’s embrace, instead of with friends and family.

CLICK HERE FOR COMPLETE CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

The forestry services are not just suggesting citizens find a tree to hold, however, they are also encouraging people to get outside in general and engage in outdoor activities as a safe way to relax and de-stress.

The forestry services are not just suggesting citizens find a tree to hold, however, they are also encouraging people to get outside in general and engage in outdoor activities as a safe way to relax and de-stress.
(iStock)

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

Rangers have begun clearing roads and pathways leading to prime trunks for people to snuggle up to during forced social distancing and self-quarantine.

“You get such a good feeling of relaxation [from hugging] and you are ready for a new day and new challenges,” says Thor Thorfinnsson, overall forest manager for East Iceland, to BBC.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

Thorfinnsson told the outlet to aim for five minutes of tree hugs to get the most calming benefits.

But the forestry services aren’t just suggesting citizens find trees to hold. The departments are also encouraging people to get outside in general, and engage in outdoor activities as a safe way to relax and de-stress.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Tree-huggers should be cautious, though. In one study, coronavirus was found to live on treated wood for a day.



Source link